Departedlife: An online memorial for the dead

DepartedLifeDeath is something which can’t be avoided but memories around life can be well preserved and cherished for generations. Departedlife, an Indian startup helps people to  immortalize their loved ones who are no longer with them and revive unforgettable moments.

Departedlife aims to create a network of remembrance pages where family and friends can pay tribute, create a remembrance page for a departed soul, upload photos and videos and invite family and friends to pay tribute to a life well lived.

Launched by Rahul Suri and Puneet Gupta – Departedlife allows users to signup via email or using a Facebook account. To create a profile, users need to add details like name of the departed soul, birth date, death date, facts and brief description about them amongst several others. Besides writing good things about departed souls, users can also mention their bad or hated qualities.

Users can also invite their Facebook friends to talk on the departed soul profile. Currently, Departedlife is in beta, and has more than 200 registered members with 150 departed profiles.

Sharing his thought behind launching such unique platform, Rahul Suri, Founder, Departedlife said “My mother passed away in 2007 and I was really shaken up over her death. Gradually, grief gave way to a need for preserving my memory of her for my children – it was like I wanted to build an online monument to her. That was when I felt the need for a site like DepartedLife”.

Departedlife plans to extend option for its users to make his/her own profile through which descendants can see once he/she is dead with additional features such as uploading will, video, speech or confession.

“At present monetization is not a focus,” added Suri, however after integrating above planned features, Departedlife would concentrate on monetization. “So far, the platform is self funded, and not looking to raise investment in near future,” he said.

Departedlife competes with other online memorial portals such as Tributes and ilasting, however they’re mainly run by companies based in the US, and are not completely free.