Instagram, Facebook and Zuckerbergmark_zuckerberg_tie.jpg

Last few days have been full of news about these three. It all began with reports that said that Instagram’s chief executive officer Kevin Systrom shouldn’t have said no, when he was asked if he was considering another deal before Facebook acquired them for a billion dollars. This is usually an unacceptable practice in the US as it means that it did not give an opportunity to the initial bidder to make a counter offer, thus missing a chance to maximise investor’s money. Turned out that the micro blogging site Twitter had indeed made  an offer before Facebook bought the company. [More on that here]

Yesterday, Instagram said that it has perpetual rights to sell users photographs without paying or notifying users who uploaded their photographs onto their site. This was part of Facebook’s new privacy policy which was adopted last week. Instagram users were extremely angry and it was widely reported that this could even shutter the site. But then, Instagram made a U-Turn on the double saying that it isn’t true that Instagram will sell user photographs without any compensation. “It is not our intention to sell your photos,” the company said. Instagram users own their content, it said and that photos belong to the users. Instagram is working on a clearly worded policy, said its Kevin Systrom.

Meanwhile, Facebook’s billionaire chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said he is donating $500 million to a charity. The 28 year old said that the Silicon Valley Community Foundation will work on areas in education and health. [More here]

Yahoo to shut music service in China

Yahoo China announced today that it will bid farewell to its Chinese music service on January 20. A statement posted on the Web site in Chinese says: “Thank you for your continued support of Yahoo services. Due to an adjustment in our product strategy, we have decided to take Yahoo Music offline on January 20, 2013, when the service will no longer be available.” [Source]

Samsung displaces Nokia Phone marketshare

For the first time in 14 years, wireless communications giant Nokia will not sit atop the global cellphone business on an annual basis at the end of 2012—with Samsung set to seize the mobile handset market’s top rank. Samsung is expected to account for 29 percent of worldwide cellphone shipments, up from 24 percent in 2011, according to the IHS iSuppli Mobile and Wireless Communications Service at information and analytics provider IHS. Nokia’s share this year will drop to 24 percent, down from 30 percent last year. [Source]