Sometimes, its fun to share indiscriminately, like everything that comes your way, forward junk e-mails, comment on random posts or get into a tweeting frenzy. But hey, if you do all of the above, make sure you think about it for a moment. About half of adult Indian Internet users revealed that they were embarrassed or regretted sharing something online, according to a new study.

The study commissioned by chip maker Intel and conducted by Ipsos Observer says that 81% adults who are online in India share information once a week or more and close to 48% once a day or more. For communication, 64% of adults in India prefer to share information online than in person and 44% revealed that they were embarrassed or regretted for something they have shared online. While 43% of respondents said that Indians are too loud when talking on phone in public, 57% said Indians preferred to talk and drive both simultaneously, said the Intel- Ipsos annual Mobile etiquette and digital sharing study. The online survey was conducted in March in United States with a representative sample size of over 2000 people including adults and teens. A sample online survey was conducted in other countries including India and China.

In terms of content sharing 61% Indians shared photos, however video sharing is limited to 30% only. Importantly, 53% of Indian female used Internet to make new friends while 44% of male used Internet for the same purpose.
Globally, majority of adults and teens across the world are sharing information about themselves online and feel well connected with family and friends,the report said. The report points out that excluding Japan,  people across 7 countries United States, Australia, Brazil, China, France, Indonesia, Japan and India are oversharing  information while using mobile phones as six out of ten respondents (including adults and teens) have a view that other people divulge too much information about themselves online.

The report also notes the increasing influence of networking over Internet, 69% of teens feel they are “missing out” if they are not able to share or consume information online. In addition, 43% of the teen respondents willing to post every moments of their life online. More than 80% of adults responded to the survey of view that people practiced better etiquette when using mobile devices in public. Majority of people think mobile manners have become worse, with the exception of adults in China who are more likely than others to believe mobile manners have truly started to improve.

More than 30% of teens around the world, excluding Japan and Indonesia, have been embarrassed by something they have done online. A large number of respondents admit that they impersonated someone to share spurious information.